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Book Review – Kregel Exegetical Library A Commentary on the Psalms

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Book Review –  Kregel Exegetical Library A Commentary on the Psalms

When I received A Commentary on the Psalms in the mail I was surprised by the size of it. Sure, I have seen commentaries of this size before on the Psalms (nearly 1000 pages) but not as a third installment. Yes, this commentary covers just Psalm 90 -150. I would not be exaggerating to say that this is a significant work and Allen P. Ross did a fantastic job on it.

After browsing through the commentary to get a feel for the layout and structure, I turned to Psalm 110. This is the most quoted Psalm in the New Testament and is one which is the source of controversy between Dispensationalists and non Dispensationalists (this controversy surrounds the question of whether or not Jesus is currently seated on the Davidic throne or if that is a future session reserved for Israel during the millennium). I wasn’t looking for a specific position that agrees with my own, but instead was curious about how Dr. Ross handled navigated through the Psalm.  In my estimation he handled it quite well and stuck with the context of the Old Testament Psalm as well as the passages which quote it in the New Testament.

Each Psalm starts off with an original translation by the author, followed by an introduction to the unique context and problems presented in the Psalm. This is followed by a commentary in expository form and concludes with the message and application of the Psalm. I really appreciated this format and found that it was easy to follow. If I were doing a sermon series on the Psalms or inserted a sermon on a Psalm for a special occasion this is a commentary that I would use extensively.

Click here to purchase A Commentary on the Psalms (90-150) [Kregel Exegetical Library] from ChristianBook.com or click here to search Amazon for the lowest price.

About the Author

A Commentary on the Psalms

Allen P. Ross (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of divinity at Beeson Divinity School. Prior to this, he taught at Trinity Episcopal School of Ministry and Dallas Theological Seminary. His publications include Creation and Blessing: A Guide to the Study and Exposition of Genesis,Holiness to the Lord: A Guide to the Exposition of the Book of Leviticus, and Introducing Biblical Hebrew.

 

 

 

 

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Kregel Academic Publishing in exchange for an online review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

6 thoughts on “Book Review – Kregel Exegetical Library A Commentary on the Psalms

  1. Jenny

    My husband has the first two volumes and LOVES them! I’m sure he’ll get this one when he gets to Psalm 90 in his series on Psalms.

  2. Ryan Smith

    Hi Aaron, how does this compare to other commentaries on the Psalms like VanGemeren or Kidner?

    • Ryan that’s a loaded question! In my opinion VanGemeren is tops as far as commentaries on Psalms. It’s just hard to beat. I think Kidner is good as well but not as detailed as you will find with either VanGemeren or Ross. Use all three for a well rounded perspective. They each add something different.

  3. Lenette

    I’ve always loved the Psalms. So reassuring. I read them and know God is on our side. He comforts us and avenges the evil ones.

  4. Lonny

    Where does the author fall in the Dispensationalism / Covenant spectrum? You started going there but didn’t reveal the spoiler!

    • Lonny that is kind of hard to discern from this book. If I had to guess based on this commentary alone I’d say he’s a progressive dispensationalist. However, there are so many more issues involved that can’t be ascertained from this volume alone. It would be interesting to find out though. That said, this is a fine work and worth reading regardless of which side you agree with more.

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